Disrupt (or die trying)

Georgia peaches...
Georgia peaches…

If you’ve been on this site before, you probably recognize a pattern to my writing. Each Friday, I share three things I heard, learned or saw during the week.  In past posts, I’ve penned a number of “disruptive” stories that ranged from Brett King’s perspectives on banks (“Does Banking Need a Re-boot”) to John Cantarella’s on Time Inc.’s digital strategies (“Dass de Thing”).  So it should come as no surprise that I furiously began writing today’s column on a flight home from Atlanta on Wednesday evening.  I’d just spent several hours in the offices of the William Mills Agency, one of the nation’s preeminent financial public relations and marketing firms, and left inspired.  What follows are just three of the many Fintech companies the agency represents that are doing some pretty cool things.  IMHO, banks of all sizes might pay attention to these tech companies if they want to disrupt the status quo rather than have their status quo disrupted.

(1) In Bank Director’s home town of Nashville, TN resides the corporate marketing team for CSI, a leading provider of end-to-end technology solutions.  The public company delivers core processing, managed services, mobile and Internet solutions, payments processing along with print and electronic distribution & regulatory compliance solutions to financial institutions.  I like their resource center, but really appreciate their blog that highlights myriad client success stories.  For instance, “How One Bank “does” Social Media Right” shines a light on First Kentucky’s one and only social media strategy.  To wit: not a word about CSI’s involvement with the bank in favor of why the bank decided not to sell things to its social fans and followers.  A “fun and light” client example that shows a more intimate side of the bank vis-a-vis one of their preferred service providers.

(2) For many financial institutions, the gap between the strategy set by the board and subsequent execution can be quite wide.  As Steve Hovde (an investment banker and regular speaker at some of our larger events) shared with us, “bankers are conservative by nature, and the credit crisis served as a stark reminder why they should be. Still, many banks—particularly smaller, community banks—are reluctant to take advantage of strategic opportunities that could significantly enhance shareholder value.” So when First Midwest Bank (a not-so-small $9 billion institution based in Illinois) needed to measure product and customer profitability to support pricing and product offering decisions with accurate contribution margin results, I learned they turned to Axiom EPM.  The company, a provider of financial planning and performance management software, affords “visibility into profitability across the organization.” If you’re keen to learn how First Midwest analyzes profitability at their bank, you might take a look at this on-demand video.

(3) To wrap things up, let me pose a question: how fast would you switch to a different bank if you were the victim of online banking fraud?  Before you answer below (hint, hint), can you guess the percentage of your peers that would immediately?  From a banker’s perspective, such cyber risk poses a real threat to a business model.  Having worked in the IT space for 5+ years, I was curious if its possible to offer online and mobile banking with no possibility of this happening to a customer… ever.  Entersekt, a South African company with designs on the U.S. market, believes it is.  According to a few of the good folks at William Mills, the folks there are the pioneers in transaction authentication.  That is, the company “harnesses the power of electronic certificate technology with the convenience of mobile phones” to provide financial institutions and their customers with full protection from online banking fraud.  Authenticating millions of transactions globally, none of Entersekt’s clients have experienced a successful phishing attack on their systems since implementing the company’s technology.  A pretty impressive accomplishment, and nice way for me to wrap up this week’s column.

Aloha Friday!

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