The Elephant in the Room

In my opinion, the “elephant in the room” is the fact that 90% of institutions in the U.S. have less than $1Bn of assets… and that many advisers and pundits consider $2Bn to be the “magic number” a bank needs to be at or above in order to be considered viable and competitive.

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Against this backdrop, let me tee up today’s Bank Chairman/CEO Peer Exchange.  Only rarely do we limit the size of an “in-person” event; for this annual gathering, we find that small groups tend to optimize the interaction among the CEOs and Chairmen.  Essentially, the two positions that bear primary responsibility for delivering strong bottom line performance.

In a few hours, I will welcome 39 institutions to the Four Seasons — with 24 being publicly traded. The median asset size is $812M – with the biggest bank here checking in at $15.6Bn in size.  By design, we built this exclusive one and a half day event around a small number of presentations and peer exchange sessions where participants share their thoughts in a private, off-the-record setting.  For example:

  • Growth and profitability – how the top banks do it
  • Building a strong franchise
  • Perspectives on cyber security and digital issues
  • Managing risk to ensure growth
  • Compensation techniques to retain and attract new leaders and key staff

This format allows for in-depth discussions of critical, and sometimes sensitive, issues for just a bank’s CEO, Chairman and/or Lead Director to consider with their contemporaries. To kick things off this morning, we will take a look at various growth stories and strategies… and I’ll be sharing some key takeaways around that topic in the late afternoon/early evening. For more “timely” insight on trends or overarching topics, feel free to follow along on twitter where my username is @aldominick and the hashtag I’ll use is #chair14.

5 thoughts on “The Elephant in the Room

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