Look At Who Is Attending Acquire or Be Acquired

In just 20 days, we raise the lights on our 23rd annual Acquire or Be Acquired Conference.  This is Bank Director’s biggest event of the year, one primarily focused on banking’s “great game” — mergers and acquisitions.  My team has spent considerable time and energy developing a spectacular event focused on growth-related topics that range from exploring a merger to preparing for an acquisition; growing loans to capturing efficiencies; managing capital to partnering with fintech companies.  To see the full agenda, click here.

Widely regarded as one of the banking industry’s premier events, we have more than 1,000 people registered to attend AOBA later this month — an all-time high.  We couldn’t do this alone, and over the course of these 2 ½ days, executives from many of our industry’s leading professional services firms and product companies share their perspectives on “what’s now” and “what’s next.”  I invite you to take a look at all of the corporate sponsors joining us:

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As I shared in a recent post, bank executives and their boards face some major issues without clear answers.  Before heading out west, I’ll share more about the banks (and 660+ bankers) joining us at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa.  Until then, I invite you to learn more about the companies supporting this conference by hopping over to bankdirector.com. To follow the conversations happening around this conference on Twitter, I’m @aldominick and we are using #AOBA17.

Back in the Saddle

A summer vacation sunset
A summer vacation sunset

It’s been a few weeks since I last shared what I’ve heard, learned or discussed on this site. Yes, vacation treated me well. But I’m excited to get back into the swing of things and especially pleased to welcome two new people to the Bank Director team: Katy Prejeant and Jake Massey. Both can be followed on Twitter @BankDirectorAE and @WJ_Massey. As always, what follows are three things that relate to bank executives and boards that caught my eye and/or ear this week.

(1) Drive a few hours west of our Nashville offices and you can find Memphis-based Mercer Capital. The advisory firm assists banks, thrifts and credit unions with “corporate valuation requirements and transactional services.” Each month, their Bank Watch newsletter pulls together a series of articles from around the web. From stress testing to Basel III, ESOPs to a Midwestern public bank peer report, there are some interesting reads this month. But one that caught my eye wasn’t in their report – it can be found on their main site. It’s a white paper on Creating the Potential for Shared Upside. Authored by Jeff Davis (a speaker at last year’s Acquire or Be Acquired conference), the piece reviews various financial issues arising when community banks merge or sell to a larger, public institution. With many anticipating an upswing in M&A deals in the second half of 2013, it is an interesting perspective to consider.

(2) In past posts, I have noted how the banking industry is a mature one. That is, where competing on price with the BofA’s of the world may best be seen as a fool’s errand. Nonetheless, McKinsey’s classic article on “Setting Value, Not Price” should be a must read this week. While not specific to the financial space, they lay out a reality where ”people buy products and services not on price alone but on customer value: the relationship between costs and benefits.” Although this trade-off has long been recognized as critical for marketing, this month’s “Insights & Publications” shows that businesses frequently get their price–benefit position wrong. They wrote in 1997 that “value” may be one of the most overused and misused terms in marketing and pricing. If you’re game, drop me a line below and let me know if you agree this is still the case.

(3) Spend any time talking with a bank’s CEO, and keeping pace with technology (and by extension, technology risk management) is sure to come up in a discussion that involves improving their business, brand and reputation. According to a new “FS Viewpoints” published by PwC, financial institutions have, for too long, “viewed technology risk management as a defensive tactic or regulatory compliance activity.” Based on the consultancy’s observations, “existing approaches to technology risk management often provide limited value to the business.” They see a real opportunity to leverage technology risk management to provide strategic business value. This piece shows how leading institutions are shifting their focus on risk management, moving from a fragmented and reactive compliance approach to a more balanced, business-aligned, risk-based strategy.
Aloha Friday!

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