Guest Post: Variety is the Spice of Life

As promised, a special guest author for this Friday’s column: Bank Director magazine’s Managing Editor, Naomi Snyder.  Having shared my key takeaways from our annual Bank Audit & Risk Committees conference on Wednesday and Thursday, I invited Naomi to share her post-conference thoughts on my blog.  So this morning’s title is as much about truth in advertising as it is an invitation to learn what my friend and colleague deemed timely and relevant.

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At Al’s request, I’m going to step in and give a quick recap of Bank Director’s Audit and Risk Committees Conference in Chicago this week.  As you can tell from this picture, nearly 300 people attended our conference at The Palmer House hotel and they got a lot of frightening news about risks for their financial institutions, including cyber risk, interest rate risk, compliance and reputation risk in the age of social media.  I’m going to address three of those points today.

Interest Rate Risk

Many banks are extending credit at a fixed rate of interest for longer terms in an effort to compete and generate much-needed returns. This will be a problem for some of them when interest rates rise and low cost deposits start fleeing for higher rates elsewhere. You could assume the liability/asset equation will equal out, but will it? Steve Hovde, the president and CEO of the investment bank Hovde Group in Chicago, is worried about a bubble forming, saying he has seen credit unions offer 10- or 15-year fixed rate loans at 3.25 percent interest. “I’m seeing borrowers get better deals with good credit quality than they have ever gotten in history,” he says.

Reputation Risk

In an age of social media, anyone can and does tweet or post on Facebook any complaint against your bank. Cyber attacks, such as the one that befell Target Corp., can be devastating and cost the CEO his or her job. Rhonda Barnat, managing director of The Abernathy MacGregor Group Inc., says it’s important not to cater to TV news, such as telling a reporter that your employee’s laptop was stolen at a McDonald’s with sensitive customer information, prompting a visit by the camera crew to the McDonald’s. Not disclosing how many customer records were stolen could keep you off the front page. Focus on the people who matter most: your customers and investors and possibly, your regulators. They want to know how you are going to fix the problem that impacts them.

Compliance Risk

Regulators are increasingly breathing down the necks of bank directors, wanting evidence the board is actively engaged and challenging management. The official minutes need to reflect this demand, without necessarily going overboard with 25 pages of detailed discussion, for example. Local regulators are increasingly deferring questions to Washington, D.C., where they can get stuck in limbo. When regulators do give guidance, it is often only verbal and can cross the line into making business decisions for the bank, says Robert Fleetwood, a partner at Barack Ferrazzano in Chicago. In such an environment, it’s important to have good relations with your regulators and to keep them informed.

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About Naomi: Prior to joining our team, she spent 13 years as a business reporter for newspapers in South Carolina, Texas and Tennessee. Most recently, she was a reporter for The Tennessean, Nashville’s daily newspaper. She also was a correspondent for USA Today. Naomi has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in Journalism from the University of Illinois.  To follow her wit and wisdom on Twitter, follow @naomisnyder.

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